Ann Arbor Review

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Bilall Maliqi
Duane Locke
Eddie Awusi
Silvia Scheibli
Amit Parmessur
Lyn Lifshin
Juan Hongi
Shutta Crum
Peycho Kanev
Fahredin Shehu
Lana Bella
Laszlo Slomovitz
Abdulrahman M Abu-  yaman
Elisavietta Ritchie
Michelle Bailat-Jones
Keith Moul
Aneek Chatterjee

Tom Evans
Robert Nisbet
Paul B. Roth
Alex Ferde
Alan Britt

Richard Gartee
Karyn M. Bruce

Ali Znaidi
Running Cub
John Grey

Jennifer Burd
Fred Wolven

Helen Gyigya


Ann Arbor Review

is an independent

International Journal & ezine

Copyright (c) 2018 Francis Ferde
All rights revert back to each poet.
--editor / Southeastern Florida
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AAR history note:  in print 1967 - 1980.  Irregular publications 1980 - 2004.  As ezine 2004 - present. Most of 51 years all together....

------------------------------------------------
staff:
Francis Ferde
Silver Grey Fox
Running Cub
Fred Wolven
 

Submissions via e-mail:

poetfred@att.net


 

SAILING DICTIONARY

The center of effort is the point in the sail plan
that is the balance of all wind forces. Knowing nothing

of sails, even less of direction, I refuse the harbor,
choosing a seagull study instead, admiring how their bodies

know exactly what to do with the air. Well, I do know
something of waiting. I know how to watch the wagtail, too,

marching his salt and pepper army of one along the lake walk.
No, I don’t want to go where I’m going even if it will balance

the wind forces, help me find a way in through the surf.
The old black sailboat hulks in the waves, gothic

and massive and dark—but so beautiful, too.
Each time I look up from the birds, from the line of sun

on that immense blue, the boat has changed
its angle, and it dawns on me that there is a tether.

A deep anchoring that permits only this controlled swing.
The arc is wide and the boat looms, but despite

the promise in the height of the mast—it would be quite
a thing to see those sails unfurl, the shadows

they would throw—it can only rotate around its anchor,
it can only swing and then settle in to its original position.

 

 

Michelle Bailat-Jones, St.Legier, Switzerland 

 

 

 

 


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